the red pincushion

musings on learning, living, and sometimes dancing

One year on the AIP/Paleo diet (+ favorite recipes)

When I was a teenager, I was diagnosed with an autoimmune condition known as Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis. I could write an entire post about the sometimes mysterious “root cause” of the disease and its varied manifestations, but I will leave that to the experts. In short, it’s a misunderstood disease that affects pretty much every part…

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Chapter 3 WMTRBW #HortonFreire #OpenEd16. See also: The immorality of service organizations

Leadership: I love it, and it’s heart breaking. I said this to Sonja in a meeting recently and I have been repeating it to myself as I process everything that has happened over the last weeks and months. It was a realization coming out of OpenEd16, a bittersweet event full of friends, and learning, and challenges, and tears. Conferences don’t…

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We Make The Road by Walking: Ch 1-2 #HortonFreire

[This post is pretty personal and it may offend some people. I’m sorry about that. Please know that I am coming from a place of personal struggle, not condemnation.] I am reading “We Make the Road by Walking” by Paulo Freire and Myles Horton, as part of a book club started by Bryan Alexander (and with…

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Not waving, but drowning

by Stevie Smith Nobody heard him, the dead man, But still he lay moaning: I was much further out than you thought And not waving but drowning. Poor chap, he always loved larking And now he’s dead It must have been too cold for him his heart gave way, They said. Oh, no no no,…

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Love / resistance

[I made a version of these statements in last week’s Future Trends Forum with Bryan Alexander. I am so grateful for Bryan’s support last week and for his letting me voice these thoughts. I’ll share the video when it’s available] I feel devastated. We need love more than ever. And resistance. Now more than ever…

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The locks on our bridges: Critical instructional design (#OpenEd16 presentation)

This excerpt is from my talk with Sean Michael Morris and Amy Slay at Open Education 2016 about Critical Instructional Design. Read Sean’s post Critical Instructional Design and Acts of Resistance for his take, which mine follows.  As you listen to/read Sean’s description of Critical Instructional Design, you might be thinking, “YES, sounds great! I…

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Digital Pedagogy Lab Institute 2016 – Notes from the Design Track

Inspired by the reflections shared by Audrey Watters and Lee Bessett Skallerup, I am sharing my notes and thoughts on last week’s Digital Pedagogy Lab Institute hosted at the University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, VA. It was an amazing week and I feel lucky (The Luckiest, as I told Sean and Jesse) to have the…

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Love and risk in education: A call to resistance [Part 2]

(This is a rough transcript of my Campus Technology 2016 keynote, given August 4, 2016. Thanks to Stephen Downes for filming & streaming the talk!) Love. Love in education may look like a lot of things. Here are a few that I will propose: Love is questionability. It resists essentialism because love seeks to understand each…

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Love and risk in education: A call to resistance [Part 1]

(This is a rough transcript of my Campus Technology 2016 keynote, given August 4, 2016. Thanks to Stephen Downes for filming & streaming the talk!) Many of you in the room probably don’t know me. I haven’t been a regular at this conference—and I know that we start to become familiar with people who we…

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Not-yetness and love

Part 2 of notes from my keynote at the Digital Pedagogy Lab in Cairo, Egypt, hosted by the American University in Cairo. Thanks to Maha Bali, our amazing and gracious host, and to AUC for putting together this delightful event.  Click here or on the image above to view the video of the talk, Not-yetness…

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Not-yetness and learnification

Video and notes from my keynote at the Digital Pedagogy Lab in Cairo, Egypt, hosted by the American University in Cairo. Thanks to Maha Bali, our amazing and gracious host, and to AUC for putting together this delightful event.  Click here or on the image above to view the video of the talk, Not-yetness In…

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a plate of amazing pasta

Around the world & gluten free: Italy

Italy is amazing. Best food I’ve ever eaten and YES very gluten-free friendly. Not only are there gf options almost anywhere you go, Italians take gluten intolerances very seriously.  From the gelato scooper who switched gloves and equipment to serve some fine gelato, to the mom-and-pop restaurant who ordered specially-made gf pasta because they knew we were dining there, we…

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picture of people's feet while dancing

Dance your way to wellness

There are many ways to stay fit and it is important to choose a fitness plan that works with your schedule and your interests. For me, no fitness plan really “stuck” until I found Jazzercise, a high-intensity aerobic dance program that combines popular music with cardio-pumping dance moves. What I love about Jazzercise is that…

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What about qualitative research in the “new data science of learning?” #digped

An email I once received from a graduate student at Stanford: “There was also some talk last week about starting a Qualitative Methods Special Interest Group (haha almost wrote support group)…” [emphasis mine] Support group indeed. I will send a shout-out on Twitter to the person who comes up with the best name for such…

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Around the world & gluten free: Montreal (bonus: Philly)

I visited Montreal in what was described by the locals as the “ugly time of year” but I found the city to be enchanting (though colder than I would have liked). I was visiting Montreal for work but I managed to add a day at the end for sightseeing and Jesse-and-Celine-style walkabouts, sadly without my “Jesse” in tow….

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Where the dance takes you

Last weekend I celebrated three years of teaching Jazzercise. Three years. Wow. It is roughly the same amount of time I’ve been living in California and working at Stanford. Moving here was one of the hardest things we’ve ever done—we were nearly broke, separated as a family for 8 months, and we struggled to settle in to…

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Mess & not-yetness at #et4online

I returned from #et4online last week with a happy heart and a whirligig brain. I learned a lot, and will be reflecting on those things over the next weeks, but I wanted to start by reflecting on how not-yetness came into my #et4online experience. After Jen Ross and I gave a plenary talk on “Mess in Online Education”…

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Not-yetness: Examples

Wow, thanks for all of the responses to my first not-yetness post. I love to hear your thoughts and questions about not-yetness so please keep them coming (it’s helpful if you use a #notyetness hashtag). In the meantime, you should read the following posts from colleagues: Alyson Indrunas (@AlysonIndrunas), NotYetness, Invention, and the Dream/Reality Whiteboard…

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sunrise over Edinburgh
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Not-yetness

I have done several talks lately about the idea of not-yetness. It’s an idea that Jen Ross (University of Edinburgh) and I first wrote about in our chapter, Complexity, mess, and not-yetness: Teaching online with emerging technologies, to be published in the forthcoming second edition of Emerging Technologies in Distance Education. In the first edition of the…

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picture of my son drinking butter beer
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Around the world & gluten free: England, Scotland, France

I am starting a series of posts—don’t worry, they’ll be sporadic at best—about my gluten free adventures as I travel to different places around the world. I decided to do this because I have benefitted tremendously from various articles on gluten free travel. I hope some people will find these posts useful. If not, move along. I…

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